The awesome truth about Change, pain is optional.

"There is no pain in Change, there is only pain in the resistance to change." Click To Tweet

Whenever I think of change, I think of my dad. The first time I ever heard this saying was in 1988. I had been out of my house for a little while. I had about three years, clean and sober. At the time, I was only 18. I was homeless, and I ended up having to move in with my dad for the first time.

Struggle comes from trying to change others instead of self.

When the decision came for me to move in with him. One of the things that he said was, “there is no pain in change. There’s only pain in the resistance to change.” And it has stuck with me ever since.

I can recall a time when I had hurt a young lady that I had been dating. I had never been much on talking about my past. My focus has always been on moving forward. I’m not afraid of my past, that’s just me. But there was something from my past, that she found out about, that hurt her. And I remember saying to someone, with tears in my eyes, “I know that there is no pain in change, but damn it, I want to resist this change.” And I meant it.

PaulDavid

Wake up, get dressed and live a new day.

Its time to wake up, get dressed and live a new day. 

Screen shot of our dry erase board with the kid's at home schedule during the pandemic.

Keeping unity in the house can always be a challenge, even without being confined by a pandemic. For us to maintain our unity, we have to have some sense of normality.

Keeping a sense of “Normal Life” is what differentiates between Living Life or just existing. Maintaining unity in our house is how we nurture and support Hope. We do this by trying to live by the 12 Traditions of recovery.

Tradition One: Our common welfare Has to come first. Our individual growth and well-being depend on our family’s unity.

There are seven specific actions we employ in our house. To help bring some normality to us.

Continue reading “Wake up, get dressed and live a new day.”

Self-Centeredness Kept me Sick

As a recovering addict, one realization I had to come to terms with early on was that self-centeredness was at the core of my addiction.

Being ultimately concerned with ‘fixing myself.’ Taking care of my inexhaustible hunger for more, not realizing how my addictive behavior affected everyone around me. I became sick without realizing I was sick.

It wasn’t until I became aware of how my self-centeredness had made my relations with others sick. How I brought harm and turmoil to those, I came into contact with, especially those closest to me, that I became able to see just how sick I had gotten.

Continue reading “Self-Centeredness Kept me Sick”